Pence talks trade in New Mexico

New Mexico

Vice president expected to discuss new trade deal, visit Federal Law Enforcement Training Center

Vice President Mike Pence speaks to the media during a visit to the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Munro, Thursday, July 11, 2019, in Coronado, Calif. Pence will visit McAllen, Texas, on Friday to tour a migrant detention facility.(AP Photo/Denis Poroy)

ARTESIA, New Mexico (KRQE) ⁠— Vice President Mike Pence took the campaign trail to Southeastern New Mexico, where visited the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center and also talked about the trade agreements between the United States, Mexico, and Canada.

Pence visited Elite Well Services, an acidizing and fracking firm. Pence spoke about the USMCA agreement and how it will benefit the economy and workers, particularly farmers and ranchers. That agreement is essentially an updated version of the NAFTA agreement.

The event was run by America First Policies, an organization supporting policy initiatives by the Trump administration.

Pence is expected to visit the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, or FLET-C, in Artesia.

After his stop in New Mexico, Pence is off to Salt Lake City later Wednesday afternoon.

President Trump lost by eight points in New Mexico in 2016. According to a recent Emerson poll, his approval rating is down to 35% in New Mexico.

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