Border apprehensions drop as immigration crackdown continues

Immigration

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of migrants apprehended at the southern U.S. border declined in September for the fourth straight month, Trump administration officials said Tuesday.

Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Mark Morgan talks to reporters in the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House October 08, 2019 in Washington, DC. Morgan talked about the number of cross-border apprehensions of undocumented migrant individuals and families and the progress of the building of a border wall along the U.S.-Mexico boundary. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Mark Morgan said border officials encountered about 52,000 migrants at the border last month — down about 65% from the peak in May of about 144,000.

The news will likely be greeted with glee by President Donald Trump, who has used the monthly tally as a benchmark for whether his hardline immigration policies are working. Curbing immigration has been Trump’s signature issue, but the overall numbers rose dramatically under his watch.

The number of people encountered at the border during the 2019 budget year is likely to be nearly 1 million, one of the highest figures on record.

The volume of border crossers vastly strained resources and prompted an outcry over fetid conditions at border stations where families and children were held for days and weeks at a time in facilities meant to hold them at maximum for 72 hours.

The number of migrants crossing the border traditionally declines in hot summer months. Numbers tend to rebound when the weather gets cooler, though officials have insisted that the decline cannot be explained simply by seasonal factors. Morgan said the administration’s strategies have brought about results.

Those policies have included denying asylum to most migrants who crossed through another country to arrive at the U.S.-Mexico border and sending more than 45,000 migrants back to Mexico to wait out their asylum claims.

“This administration’s strategies have brought about results, dramatic results,” Morgan said from the White House press briefing room.

Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Mark Morgan talks to reporters in the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House October 08, 2019 in Washington, DC. Morgan talked about the number of cross-border apprehensions of undocumented migrant individuals and families and the progress of the building of a border wall along the U.S.-Mexico boundary. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Fewer people are being held in custody at border facilities. Four months ago, it was about 19,000, a massive number when 4,000 was considered a crisis. Now it’s just under 4,000, Morgan said.

Most immigrants coming to the U.S. are Central American families who are fleeing violence and poverty and turn themselves in after crossing the border. Many seek asylum.

The administration has depended on Mexico for its “Remain in Mexico” program, which sends asylum-seekers back to Mexico to wait for U.S. court hearings.

But there are increasing reports that migrants have been kidnapped, robbed or fallen victim to extortion in Mexico. Homicides in Mexico soared to nearly 35,000 last year, an increase from the peak of the 2011 cartel violence that left 27,000 dead.

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