Exotic dancers in Mexico adapting to new normality

Coronavirus

MEXICO CITY (AP) — The pandemic has forced Mexico’s entertainment nightspots to suspend operations because they are considered non-essential activities, but some businesses have found a way around.

The at-home performance was always part of the business model for “Mi Ultimo Beso” or My Last Kiss, a company that focuses on bringing entertainment to clients’ homes as a way of offering the exotic dance services in the safety of people’s residences in a city considered unsafe at night.

But when Mexico City implemented its quarantine measures four months ago, the company stopped operating for a month.

Manager Valente Estrada said he dedicated himself to developing a sanitary protocol that would allow the company to continue operating and keep their 50 employees working during the pandemic.

Prior to the quarantine lockdown, the company performed 15 shows per week. Now, they are doing between three and five. Estrada said they also offer a 10 percent discount.

A 1.5 hour show with three dancers costs approximately $160, said Estrada.

A worker sprays a living room with disinfectant in preparation for dancers performing in a client’s home in Mexico City, Saturday, Aug. 8, 2020. The pandemic has forced business to adapt to a new normality and the adult entertainment industry is no exception. After three months of inactivity, Mi Ultimo Beso relaunched his table-dance-at-home service observing health measures. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

Estrada’s health protocol includes having a person in charge of the sanitary measures, checking oxygenation levels and temperatures of everyone in the room, including dancers and clients.

The space designated as stage is disinfected and markers are placed on the floor indicating safe social distances.

The dancers say these precautions make them feel safe. During the 1.5 hours that The Associated Press stayed on site, no one took off their face masks.

A client wearing a protective face mask measures the temperature of a dancer as she enters his home, in Mexico City, Saturday, Aug. 8, 2020. The pandemic has forced business to adapt to a new normality and the adult entertainment industry is no exception. After three months of inactivity, Mi Ultimo Beso relaunched its table-dance-at-home service observing health measures. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

One of the dancers, who goes by the stage name Kelly Marin, 29, says she fears others might not take care of themselves as they should.

Estrada said it’s very satisfying for him to be able to take the show to people who take recommendations to stay home seriously.

And despite the challenging conditions, he remains optimistic about the future, and is planning to include a pandemic-related act in November.

Copyright 2021 Nexstar Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

California Correspondent Latest Stories

More Salvador Rivera

El Paso Correspondent Latest Stories

More Julian Resendiz

South Texas Correspondent Latest Stories

More Sandra Sanchez

Border Report Correspondents' Stories

Latest Stories

Washington D.C.

More Washington D.C.
borderlogo

About Border Report

The mission of BorderReport.com is to provide real-time delivery of the untold local stories about people living, working and migrating along the U.S. border with Mexico. The information is gathered by experienced and trusted Nexstar Media Group journalists hired specifically to cover the border.